Congratulations to our 2020 Data Jam Winners!

The Baltimore Data Jam Competition – Accessible science This year saw the 7th Annual Baltimore Data Jam Competition.  Each year I look forward to seeing the variety of student projects that both describe a local socio or ecological data set and communicate that data in a creative way.  We’ve seen submissions from original songs and […]

Message from the LTER Network Executive Board on recent events

On June 2, the LTER Executive Board shared the following message with all members of the LTER community: Dear LTER Community, As millions of people raise their voices in response to the killing of George Floyd, we are filled with grief and anger and reminded how far we still are from the fair and just […]

Latest BES LTER BioScience paper featured in podcast

BES LTER Director Emeritus, Dr. Steward Pickett, discusses ‘Theoretical Perspectives of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study: Conceptual Evolution in a Social–Ecological Research Project’ on the latest BioScience Talks podcast. Discover how we decide what data should be collected, the surprising finding about urban tree canopy and crime, how we developed an entirely new way of looking […]

The importance of the new BES LTER theoretical perspectives paper

Theoretical Perspectives of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study: Conceptual Evolution in a Social–Ecological Research Project by Pickett et al. is an important addition to urban ecology literature for several reasons. Urban ecology (or even urban science) is most often justified because urbanization is one of the biggest global transformations of the 21st century; however its theoretical underpinnings […]

Low-Income Baltimore Blocks Host Bigger, More Dangerous Mosquitoes

Scientific American reports on BES LTER mosquito research… “A new study published last October in the Journal of Medical Entomology found that in Baltimore, low-income neighborhoods bear the biggest burden: they have not only more mosquitoes but also larger ones, which often survive longer. The problem most likely is rooted in the fact that Baltimore has nearly […]

A walk in the woods – 17 years later

Check out BES graduate student Ian Yesilonis’ post in the Short Stories About Long-Term Research blog. He writes about the ups and downs of urban field research over time. “In the field, I was prepared for mosquitoes, dog and black-legged ticks, and poison ivy but I was not prepared for stray dogs.  At one plot […]

BES featured in national Parks & Recreation magazine

The Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) is a groundbreaking urban ecology research project that launched in 1997 and, 22 years later, is still…producing novel and important research. As one of the NSF’s 28 LTER sites, the BES aims to understand the city as a living, ecological system and has brought together researchers from across the country […]

BES Breakdowns – Take a dive into a recent scientific paper

‘Towards an urban marine ecology: characterizing the drivers, patterns and processes of marine ecosystems in coastal cities’ by Peter A. Todd, Eliza C. Heery, Lynette H. L. Loke, Ruth H. Thurstan, D. Johan Kotze, and Christopher Swan Urban ecology explores the effects of our activities on ecological processes. Urban ecologists work to connect this understanding […]

Back to the wild: how ‘ungardening’ took root in America

Our co-PI Dr. Christopher Swan talks about his rewilding efforts in Baltimore. Could greening vacant lots and ‘ungardening’ yards can lead to more ecosystem services and better public health? Read more.

How Baltimore is saving urban forests – and its city

How did Baltimore become an improbable green model for cities around the world and how was the Baltimore Ecosystem Study part of it? Find out here.