Entries by emmros5_863opb

Emma Rosi-Marshall Becomes Sole Director of BES

Dr. Emma Rosi-Marshall has been co-directing BES with me since 2013.  That year, BES was reviewed by a visiting committee, and the results of that event helped us to shape the renewal process that would culminate with a new proposal in 2016.  After that review, Emma began to take an increasing leadership role in planning […]

How Many Principles of Urban Ecology Are There?

By Steward T.A. Pickett (Cary Institute) & Mary L. Cadenasso (University of California Davis) In 2008, we published a short paper on the principles of urban ecology (Cadenasso and Pickett 2008).  It was aimed at landscape architects and landscaping practitioners as a part of an “Ecological Landscaping” conference attended mainly by these professionals.  Consequently, we […]

Community Awareness and Field Safety Training

Every year, about this time, the Baltimore Ecosystem Study hosts its Community Awareness and Field Safety training.  We expect that every new participant in BES, whether student or senior professor, participate in this event the first year they become part of the project.  Why do we ask this of the members of a scientific research […]

BES Adopts a Co-Directorship Model

Preparing for transitions in leadership in Long-Term Ecological Research projects is a big job.  The Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) has been preparing for its leadership succession since 2013.  Emma agreed at that time to become the next director of BES — assuming a successful renewal proposal review.  Her acceptance of that responsibility was announced at […]

Yes, But What Theory Are You Testing?

Urban ecology talks and papers often begin with statements like these: More than half the world’s human population now lives in cities. Urban areas in the United States cover 3% of the country’s area. Cities are harbingers of global warming, and already represent the drier and warmer conditions many habitats will increasingly experience. Like other […]

The Invisible in the City

Much that happens in cities — urban areas more broadly — is not obvious to the naked eye or to casual observation.  The invisible things in urban social-ecological systems represent four key dimensions: social processes and their legacies; the built and technological structures and infrastructures; ecological structures and processes; and influences and events that arrive […]

“Why Does Baltimore Look Like It Does?”

I had the pleasure of contributing to a field trip of visiting landscape architecture students and their professor recently.  Getting out in the neighborhoods and habitats in Baltimore is always fun and rewarding.  Plus the reaction to visitors often helps refine how we talk about and present our work and engagement with communities. While showing […]

Urban Ecology Takes a Long Time

We are extraordinarily fortunate in Baltimore to have long-term support for our urban social-ecological research and engagement.  BES is funded in 6 year increments, subject to review and approval by the National Science Foundation’s rigorous peer driven process.  It is very likely that our ability to contribute substantially to the consolidation and progress of modern […]